visions d’exil

Regarde-moi


Collective exhibition

Regarde-moi

2 Nov - 2 Decclosed Mondays

10am—5.30pm; Wed 9.00pm; weekends 7.00pm

Palais de la Porte Dorée – Musée national de l’histoire de l’immigration, Hall Marie Curie

Fri 2 Nov, 6.00pm

exhibition opening

In all places, at all times, the figure of the Exile is the focus of speculation. He or she is that other who would jeopardise our comfort and habitus, who would invade on our territory. Alternately the face of threat or tragedy, the exile inexorably bears the brunt of insecurity, crisis and problems of any nature. Five portraits and a giant frieze depicting what this “troubling” other could be were commissioned from six artists who have experienced exile, to give shape to black and white faces, ready to face other people’s gazes. Is the life of the exile worth less than ours?

Works by Lina Aljijakliaa-e (Syria), Mahmoud Halabiaa-e (Lebanon), Omar Ibrahimaa-e (Syria), Kubra Khademiaa-e (Afghanistan), in residence at the Cité internationale des arts, Kouka Ntadi (France), Hura Mirshekariaa-e (Iran), hosted at the Cité internationale des arts as part of the Ministry of Culture’s programme of residence and support for refugee artists from conflict areas, in partnership with the French Institute.

The exhibition is also accessible in the evening during events.

Destiny in Exile


Photographs by Maral Bolouri

Destiny in Exile

16 to 30 novclosed Mondays

2.00pm - 7.00pm; Fri, Sat 2.00pm - midnight

Cité internationale des arts — Montmartre site

Fri 16 Nov, 6.00pm

exhibition opening

Destiny: in Farsi sarnevesht literally means “written on the head”. The project documents portraits of artists in exile. Each artist is presented in three different views. An image represents him with a label of his past, a marker of what deprived him of freedom and identity and uprooted him from his homeland. Another shows him with a stereotype of the society in which he has taken refuge and where he hopes to settle. The third image is a definition of himself or a message from the artist because the experience of uprooting could change him and define him forever.

Maral Bolouriaa-e (Iran), in residence at the Cité internationale des arts.

Récit(s)


Audiovisual installation by Lola Créïs & Philippe Ulysse

Récit(s)

16 to 30 Novclosed Mondays

2.00pm - 7.00pm; Fri, Sat 2.00pm - midnight

Cité internationale des arts — Montmartre site

Fri 16 Nov at 6.00pm

exhibition opening

What does it mean to tell the story of your life, to tell your story? The question is all the more acute for exiles whose access to refugee status is conditioned by their history and the way they embody it. In the framework of writing a documentary film, Lola Créïs and Philippe Ulysse reflect on the question of narrative. What does the story tell us both of the person recounting it and the one person listening to it? Are all stories the same? Is a narrative a good story?

Based on a workshop “La fabrique du récit” (Creating narratives) conducted at the artists in exile workshop in July 2018 by Lola Créïs (France) and Philippe Ulysse (France). Sound: Jérôme Petit (France).

Once there was a way to get back homeward / Once there was a way to get back home…*


Collective installation

Once there was a way to get back homeward / Once there was a way to get back home…*

16 to 30 Novclosed Mondays

2.00pm - 7.00pm; Fri, Sat 2.00pm - midnight

Cité internationale des arts — Montmartre site

Fri 16 Nov, 6.00pm

exhibition opening

A human being is lucky if he or she has the “right” passport. In promoting “selective” immigration, sovereign states have reduced hospitality to issues of utility. Asylum seekers are sorted into desirable and undesirable migrants. The former receive a residency permit, the others are condemned to returning where they came from.
What can art offer in response? The public is invited to enter a tent, made from city detritus and embroidered and sewn portraits of exiles, and to ask themselves what they should do…

Based on the workshop “Textile portraits and embroidery” carried out at the agency of artists in exile by Zina Katz, from July to November 2018.
* John Lennon & Paul McCartney, 1969.

164 nuits


Textile installation by Zina Katz

164 nuits

16 to 30 Novclosed Mondays

2.00pm - 7.00pm; Fri, Sat 2.00pm - midnight

Cité internationale des arts — Montmartre site

Fri 16 Nov, 6.00pm

exhibition opening

164 nights is the time Zina Katz spent in Paris, working with the artists’ studio in exile. She has produced an abstract portrait, reflecting her subjectivity, and her real daily life shared with exiles. It embroiders elements that reflect her impressions of the migratory “problem” and her time in the capital.

Zina Katz (Argentina) is a prizewinner of the Visual Arts Commission of the Cité internationale des arts.

En lumière


Photographs by Mohamed Abakar

En lumière

16 to 30 Novclosed Mondays

2.00pm - 7.00pm; Fri, Sat 2.00pm - midnight

Cité internationale des arts — Montmartre site

Fri 16 Nov, 6.00pm

exhibition opening

Who are these men and women who have reached the end of their great journey in Europe? They take the clothes that are given to them, dress as they can, adding layers in winter to protect themselves from the cold. Who can say if this one comes from Somalia, Sudan, Eritrea or elsewhere? They became anonymous. They are refugees. But in front of the camera, in their traditional clothes, they find their true identity, their origin, their pride, their beauty. They are in their own light. Their bodies are free, centred.

Mohamed Abakaraa-e (Sudan).

Passage obligatoire


Sculptures by Carlos Lutangu Wamba

Passage obligatoire

16 to 30 Novclosed Mondays

2.00pm - 7.00pm; Fri, Sat 2.00pm - midnight

Cité internationale des arts — Montmartre site

Fri 16 Nov, 6.00pm

exhibition opening

Carlos Lutangu Wamba arrived in France in January 2017 and works on sculptures that express his background and reality: the anxieties and worries related to his papers, his family left behind and an unknown country; the migration phenomenon; the life of an undocumented refugee and the one that follows after regularisation and the integration process. He uses recycled materials: paper collected in public transport and bars, scrap metal and plastics. He draws his inspiration from Kongo culture, combining it with modern influences, in line with the current trend in contemporary African art.

Carlos Lutangu Wambaaa-e (Democratic Republic of the Congo).

In Pursuit of Freedom


Photographs by Sara Farid

In Pursuit of Freedom

16 to 30 Novclosed Mondays

2.00pm - 7.00pm; Fri, Sat 2.00pm - midnight

Cité internationale des arts — Montmartre site

Fri 16 Nov, 6.00pm

exhibition opening

One flees one’s country due to danger, because one can no longer survive. We struggle to adapt and rebuild in a foreign country, while trying to preserve our traditions. Yet, despite the misery and pain of being uprooted, hope is reborn. Far from tyrannical regimes and political unrest, both girls and boys can go to school. Far from conservative cultures, women begin to experience freedom. Photographs that reflect the struggle and strength of refugees, women and girls who are rebuilding their futures in France.

Sara Faridaa-e (Pakistan).

Exodus


Installation and paintings by Oroubah Dieb

Exodus

16 to 30 Novclosed Mondays

2.00pm - 7.00pm; Fri, Sat 2.00pm - midnight

Cité internationale des arts — Montmartre site

Fri 16 Nov, 6.00pm

exhibition opening

The displacement of populations is at the heart of Oroubah Dieb’s work in which she addresses this theme in the form of collages enhanced with paint. She borrows the bright colours of the traditional clothes worn by Syrian countrywomen. For Exodus, the artist has created a long fresco depicting migrants on the way to a new refuge. Sculptures made of bundles greet the public, invited to enter a tent that bears witness to the lives of those who have chosen the path of exile.

Oroubah Diebaa-e (Syria).
With the help of Nour Chantout, visual artist.

Everybody Was Blind


Installation by Monique Pelser and concert of South-African music

Everybody Was Blind

16 to 30 Novclosed Mondays

2.00pm - 7.00pm; Fri, Sat 2.00pm - midnight

Cité internationale des arts — Montmartre site

Fri 16 Nov, 6.00pm

exhibition opening

Sam Tshabalala, a renowned musician, fled South Africa and the oppression of apartheid to settle in France in 1983. Monique Pelser, based in Cape Town, from a family of white police officers, chose to focus her work on performance and conceptual photography. The two artists initiate a conversation on their personal trajectories and the South African memories of the 1980s to retrace, in sound and images, the portrait of Tshabalala, an artist in exile.

Monique Pelser (South-Africa), in residence at the Cité internationale des arts, In partnership with the French Institute.

© Studio des formes